APPLES Of WISCONSIN

BUSHELS OF HEALTH BENEFITS 

Apples are unique because they’re one of the best sources of pectin, a type of fiber. Research indicates that pectin limits the amount of cholesterol the body absorbs and may be an important link in preventing heart disease.

Dieters often find apples an ideal food, because they’re sweet and bulky, yet have only 80 calories per medium apple. They fill you up, not out.

CHOOSE A HEALTHFUL SNACK

Apples come in all shades of reds, yellows, greens and combinations of these—so don’t just look for red color to tell you an apple is prime for eating.

Check the skin—it should be smooth and reasonably bruise-free. Don’t pinch—you may bruise the apple! Light russet doesn’t hurt quality or flavor.

 

A PECK OF APPLE TIPS

Store small quantities in your refrigerator, in vented plastic bags in the crisper—between 34 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Don’t allow them to freeze.

Because apples can absorb odors from other foods stored in the same area, keep apples in plastic bags. The plastic also helps retain their own moisture.

Apples ripen six to ten times faster at room temperature than when refrigerated. One or two days sifting on a counter top and the fresh crunch of your apples is lost forever.

Dipping cut apples in lemon juice helps prevent apple discoloration.

Baked apples in the microwave are quick and easy.

Spread apple slices with peanut butter for an easy children’s snack; or dip slices in honey and roll in granola.

HISTORY OF APPLE GROWING IN WISCONSIN

Apple seeds were brought to Wisconsin and planted by settlers as early as 1800. During this time there were no commercial orchards, although most of the state’s early farms included an orchard to provide fruit for the farm family.

The first commercial apple orchards in Wisconsin were planted between 1830 and 1850. These early orchards produced many different apple cultivars, some of local origin.

With its short growing season and severe winters, only the most hardy apples could be grown successfully in Wisconsin. In 1890 the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society, a forerunner of the Wisconsin Apple Growers Association, established trial orchards in many parts of the state. Many of these orchards were failures, but the project supplied information that was critical for successful commercial apple production in Wisconsin.

More that 300 commercial orchards, comprising about 6,500 acres, are now found in 57 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties. These acres hold nearly 900,000 trees and produce about 60 million pounds of fruit worth over $15 million per year. Most of the commercial acreage is found in four locations in the state. The most concentrated areas are: Crawford & Richland Counties (1,300 acres), Door County area (824 acres), Bayfield & Chippewa Counties (840 acres), and the greater Milwaukee area (900 acres).

APPLE CIDER OR JUICE

People are often confused about the difference between apple "cider" and "juice’. Many times the names are used interchangeably for freshly pressed juice of apples. Most apple growers prefer to call their fresh, no sugar added, natural beverage "cider". Freshly pressed apple cider from Wisconsin growers contains all the flavor and nutrients of fresh apples. These "liquid apples" are great served hot or cold and contain only 87 calories per 6-ounce serving. Apple Cider = 0% fat.

 "Juicy Fruit" © Roma Stock HOW MUCH? HOW MANY?

One pound of apples consists of:

4 small apples, or 3 medium apples, or 2 large apples

 

Two medium apples are equivalent to one cup grated apple.

 

About two pounds of apples make one 9’ apple pie.

 

A peck of apples weighs approximately 10 pounds.

A bushel of apples weighs about 42 pounds and

will yield 20-24 quarts of applesauce.

 

-WISCONSIN’S FAVORITE APPLES-

Try different varieties; each has a distinctive flavor, texture, aroma and color.

Harvest Dates

Variety

Appearance

Characteristics

Best Used For

Aug10- Aug20

Jerseymac

Medium; red skin

Fine, white, tart flesh

Eating

Paulared

Medium; light yellow with red

White flesh; firm and

Eating, cooking

fine-grained

Sept 5 - Sept 20

Mcintosh

Medium to large;

White flesh; juicy

Cooking, eating,

green with red blush

tender

sauces

Sept15- Sept30

Cortland

Medium to large

White flesh; flesh

Cooking, eating,

discolors slowly

salads

Sept20- Oct10

Gala

Medium; yellow skin with red stripes

Very Sweet; aromatic

Cooking, salads

Sept 25 - Oct 5

Northwestern Greening

Large; yellow-greenish skin

Yellow flesh, firm and

Cooking, salads

juicy

Honeycrisp

Medium; reddish orange

Coarse texture: crisp

Eating, Cooking

and sweet

Spartan

Medium; dark red skin

Fine, crisp, white flesh

Cooking, eating,

Sept25- Oct10

Empire

Medium; smooth crimson skin

Firm, crisp, mildly tart

Eating

Haralson

Medium to large with

Tender white flesh

Cooking. eating

dark red dots

with mild flavor

Honeygold

Medium to laroe

Yellowish white flesh;

Eating. salads

yellowish green

crisp and juicy

Red Delicious

Medium to large; five knobs on end

Sweet yellowish flesh

Eating. salads

Regent

Medium; red striped

White flesh; crisp

Eating

Fireside

Large; yellow with deep red striping

Crisp and juicy

Eating, cooking

Connell Red

Large; deep red

Crisp and juicy

Eating

Jonagold

Large; yellow skin with red blush

Yellowish flesh; sweet

Cooking, salads,

and tangy

Eating

Oct 7 - 20

Jonathan

Small; bright crimson red

Firm, crisp flesh with

Cooking, eating

sweet, tart flavor

Oct 12 - 25

Golden Delicious

Medium; yellowish green

Yellow-white flesh;

Cooking, eating

tender, juicy and sweet

Idared

Medium to large; red glossy skin

Flesh crisp; flavor

Cooking, eating,

improves with storage

Sauces, salads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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